ARISTOTLE 1

Wit is educated insolence.
Aristotle

The state comes into existence for the sake of life and continues to exist for the sake of good life.
Aristotle

Fear is pain arising from the anticipation of evil.
Aristotle

Happiness depends upon ourselves.
Aristotle

No excellent soul is exempt from a mixture of madness.
Aristotle

Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity.
Aristotle

Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.
Aristotle

The whole is more than the sum of its parts.
Aristotle

The soul never thinks without a picture.
Aristotle

The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.
Aristotle

In poverty and other misfortunes of life, true friends are a sure refuge. The young they keep out of mischief; to the old they are a comfort and aid in their weakness, and those in the prime of life they incite to noble deeds.
Aristotle

The one exclusive sign of thorough knowledge is the power of teaching.
Aristotle

You will never do anything in this world without courage. It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor.
Aristotle

Courage is the first of human qualities because it is the quality which guarantees the others.
Aristotle

The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival.
Aristotle

Hope is a waking dream.
Aristotle

A friend to all is a friend to none.
Aristotle

Some kinds of animals burrow in the ground; others do not. Some animals are nocturnal, as the owl and the bat; others use the hours of daylight. There are tame animals and wild animals. Man and the mule are always tame; the leopard and the wolf are invariably wild, and others, as the elephant, are easily tamed.
Aristotle

Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow ripening fruit.
Aristotle

The end of labor is to gain leisure.
Aristotle

There was never a genius without a tincture of madness.
Aristotle

The educated differ from the uneducated as much as the living from the dead.
Aristotle

Democracy is when the indigent, and not the men of property, are the rulers.
Aristotle

The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances.
Aristotle

To run away from trouble is a form of cowardice and, while it is true that the suicide braves death, he does it not for some noble object but to escape some ill.
Aristotle

It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims.
Aristotle

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